Back to School - Sep 2021

Covid-19 measures at KJS

Enhanced hygiene and ventilation will remain in place, as will our one-way system.

Face coverings are no longer advised for children, parents, staff and visitors either in classrooms or in communal areas. The government has removed the requirement to wear face coverings in law, but expects and recommends that they are worn in enclosed and crowded spaces where you may come into contact with people you do not normally meet. This includes public transport and dedicated transport to school or college. If there is an outbreak in a setting, a director of public health might advise the setting that face coverings should temporarily be worn in communal areas or classrooms (by children, staff and visitors, unless exempt).

Wearing face coverings is no longer a legal requirement on public transport but the government expects and recommends that they are worn in enclosed and crowded spaces where you may come into contact with people you don’t normally meet. On dedicated transport, children aged 11 and over are recommended to continue to wear a face covering when travelling to secondary school. Further information from DfE regarding dedicated transport can be found here

Covid testingUK's mass Covid-19 testing policy unlikely to reduce transmission, say  experts

Two onsite tests are required for each child at the start of term, 3-5 days apart, before children can return fully. To facilitate this, like most other schools, we will be staggering the return of students across the first week.

Regular twice weekly home testing, for staff and students, will take place thereafter until end of September.

Start of Term at KJS

The new academic year will start for students as follows:

Mon 6 Sep

  • Y7 in school (at St Helen’s Gate) all day (with 1st onsite test)
  • Y11 in school (at St Helen’s Gate) just for 1st onsite test
  • Y8 in school (at Fernside) just for 1st onsite test * Note: this is a day earlier than in previous communication

Tue 7 Sep

  • Y7 & 11 in school all day
  • Y8 in school all day * Note: this is a day earlier than in previous communication
  • Y9 & 10 in school (at St Helen’s Gate) just for 1st onsite test

Wed 8 Sep

  • all students in school all day (no testing)

Thu 9 Sep

  • all students in school all day (with 2nd onsite test for Y7, 8 & 11)

Fri 10 Sep

  • all students in school all day (with 2nd onsite test for Y9 & 10)

How to master your back-to-school routineAlarm clock

BBC Bitesize article      here

Parental survival guide                        Homework: How to help your child without too much stress

BBC Bitesize article      here                BBC Bitesize article      here

DfE reveals £3m spend on academy takeover fees

DfE blog

The Department for Education (DfE) have issued a blog here with information about the return to school in September.

DfE document

The DfE have issued a document here entitled "What parents and carers need to know"

NHS documentThe NHS Rainbow Badge Scheme | BDCT

The NHS have issued a guide here entitled "Supporting students at secondary school or college: what you need to know

Changes to contact tracing in education and childcare settings

From 19 July, education and childcare settings will no longer be asked to conduct routine contact tracing. As with positive cases in any other setting, NHS Test and Trace will work with either the positive case – or in the case of children – the parents, carers or guardian of the positive case to identify close contacts. 

There is more detail below about how that process will work and what you need to do if your child tests positive for COVID-19.

Self-isolating and taking a test

  1. If your child has symptoms, they and other members of the household should self-isolate – and you should inform their education or childcare setting. You should immediately order a PCR test for them. If the PCR result is negative, they and other members of their household can stop self-isolating (unless instructed to self-isolate for other reasons). If the PCR result is positive, they, other members of their household and any close contacts identified by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the onset of symptoms.
  2. If your child has a positive result from a lateral flow device (LFD) test, they and other members of the household should self-isolate – and you should inform their education or childcare setting. You should immediately order a confirmatory PCR test. If the confirmatory test is taken within two days and the result is negative, they and other members of their household can stop self-isolating (unless instructed to self-isolate for other reasons). If the confirmatory PCR test is positive (or is taken more than two days after the LFD), other members of their household and any close contacts identified by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the LFD test.
  3. PCR tests can be booked online through the NHS Test & Trace website or by calling 119. 
  4. PCR test results will be recorded with NHS Test and Trace automatically, but you should also communicate the result to the education or childcare setting during term time or summer provision.

Contact tracing

  1. If your child gets a positive PCR test result, NHS Test and Trace will contact you, using the details you registered when ordering the PCR test. You and/or your child will be asked a series of specific questions designed to identify who your child has been in close contact with. Being in an education or childcare setting with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 will not necessarily mean a person is identified as a close contact. 
  2. You will be asked to provide the contact details, if you know them, of any of the individuals – or their parents or guardians – who have been identified as close contacts. NHS Test and Trace will then get in touch with these close contacts and provide appropriate instructions or advice (see below).

Self-isolation and/or testing of close contacts

  1. At present, anyone identified as a close contact is legally required to self-isolate and must not attend their education or childcare setting (the only exception is if they are participating in a daily contact testing trial). Anyone identified as a non-household close contact by NHS Track and Trace must self-isolate until 10 days after the date of their most recent contact with that person. If they live in the same household, they must self-isolate until 10 days after the date of that person developing symptoms (see point 1 above) or, if that person was asymptomatic, the date of their test (see point 2 above). NHS Test and Trace will notify you of the day on which the self-isolation period ends.
  2. Close contacts are also advised to take a PCR test. If the test result is negative, they must still complete the full self-isolation period, as the test will not detect all positive cases. If the result is positive, they will need to self-isolate for a further 10 days – and NHS Test and Trace will contact them to identify any close contacts. 

From 16 August, if the close contact is under 18, they will not have to self-isolate (in line with the policy for fully vaccinated adults) but will be asked to take an PCR test immediately, other than for very young children identified as non-household contacts, and they will not need to self-isolate while awaiting the results of the test. If the PCR test is positive, they will be required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of the test. NHS Test and Trace will then get in touch to identify close contacts (see points 5 and 6 above). Further guidance on these changes to self-isolation will be provided shortly.